Plates Are Due

Requests for Proposals for Workshops by Indigenous Alaska Artists due August 30, 2020.

Energized by movements for social justice and responding to climate change, COVID-19, and cultural survival, Bunnell presents a series of workshops addressing the theme of “Protection.” These workshops aim to build skills, connection, and dialogue led by contemporary Indigenous artists in the form of regalia, wearable art, shelter, sculpture, jewelry, masks and/or other art forms. These workshops may feed the exhibit, “Protection: Adaptation and Resistance” in 2021. 

The opportunity to teach a workshop is open by competitive application to all Indigenous Alaskans due 8/30/2020 through this online application. Proposals must include:

  • artist name and contact information
  • artists bio, statement or CV
  • outline of what the artist will teach
  • workshop audience (to whom the artist will teach, i.e. intergenerational, teens, adults, etc)
  • schedule/calendar for the workshop.
  • artwork sample images

Workshops must take place between October 1 and December 1, 2020. Bunnell Arts will pay $3500 for workshop instruction and materials. Workshops must be delivered online, include at least 8 hours of instruction, multiple sessions, and serve at least 8 students. Beyond these terms, artists may set their own parameters. Bunnell will pay an additional $138.50 for shipping materials in flat rate boxes by workshop instructor to participants. 

The opportunity to participate in these workshops is open to all Alaska artists with enrollment priority for Indigenous artists. Workshops will be recorded and shared with The CIRI Foundation and on Bunnell’s website. The workshop documentation aims to communicate the intent and value of the workshops, not to replace direct participation. 

Artists interested in teaching a workshop should submit an application by August 30. Selection notification to instructors will occur by September 8. Email questions to asia@bunnellarts.org or call 907.299.1492


This program is sponsored by The CIRI Foundation’s “Journey to What Matters”